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Brain deposits are linked to cholesterol levels

Research has established an association between healthy cholesterol levels and low levels of plaque deposits in the brain. These plaque deposits have also been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Healthy cholesterol levels consist of high levels of HDL cholesterol and low levels of LDL cholesterol. This could indicate that both unhealthy cholesterol levels and brain plaque have the same root cause. Similar practices to lower cholesterol, such as changing eating habits, could have a positive impact on the prevention of Alzheimer’s by slowing the acquisition of plaque in the brain. 

 

Source: medicalnewstoday.com/articles/270710.php

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FDA is requiring elimination of trans fat

In spite of foods that claim they contain zero trans fats, they can still legally have up to 0.5 grams lurking inside. That was up until the FDA announced that it is going to require the food industry to stop using trans fats entirely due to the negative effects they have on health. They cause bad cholesterol to increase and good cholesterol to decrease. They also have been linked to more incidences of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Not only would a ban protect consumers from serious health consequences, it could also have positive economic effects by reducing the amount of medical costs incurred by ill people. The FDA is allowing for a 60-day review period for manufacturers to make comments and argue to keep trans fats if they want before it establishes the ban. 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/banning-trans-fat

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Low water consumption and cholesterol are connected

While dehydration is a serious enough problem in itself, it can also lead to other health issues. One of these is the increased production of cholesterol, which occurs as a way to keep cells moist and prevent them from losing more water. Your blood also becomes thinner and the flow-rate decreases as a result of dehydration. A slower flow-rate means that cholesterol has a better chance of adhering to the walls of your arteries, eventually hardening into plaque. It is important to be sure that you’re getting enough water throughout the entirety of the day to maintain the health of your body.  

Source: livestrong.com/article/low-water-intake-cholesterol/

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What are the effects of low cholesterol?

While there is research into the effects of high cholesterol on the body, not much has been publicized about the results of very low cholesterol levels. Reducing levels of LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is connected to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, trials are still underway to determine if there are any adverse effects of driving cholesterol down even lower than the generally recommended level. These trials are looking at new cholesterol drugs that may become an alternative to the traditional statins.

Source: well.blogs.nytimes.com/ask-well-consequences-of-low-cholesterol/

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Follow a Nordic diet to lower cholesterol

For lower levels of “bad” cholesterol and higher levels of “good” cholesterol, consider following a Nordic diet. Participants in a study conducted by Lund University who switched to this diet saw a myriad of health benefits, including positive changes in cholesterol, a decrease in damaging fat particles in the blood, and a decrease in the inflammation linked to pre-diabetes.

A Nordic diet is characterized as one high in produce like berries, legumes, cabbage, and root vegetables. It includes nuts, whole grains, rapeseed oil, and low-fat dairy products. For meat, the diet focuses on chicken, fish, and game. 

Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/261

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